Where do the atlantic and pacific oceans meet

Where do the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans meet?

where do the atlantic and pacific oceans meet

Various online videos show an ocean divided by a line, with waters clear show the point where the Atlantic and Pacific oceans “meet but don't mix” “It's terrible that people would steal a video and make false claims about. At this spot the Atlantic and Pacific oceans meet, often in a confrontation. As ships got larger, they could not navigate the Magellan Strait and had to risk. The truth of the matter is that there is no visible demarcation where the two oceans meet. In actual fact, there is no demarcation at all other than what is drawn on.

Why don't the Atlantic and Pacific oceans mix - Gulf of Alaska where two oceans meet but do not mix

Find the first time this video appeared online. To do this, click on "Tools" at the top of your Google search, then "Time" and then click on a "Custom range" date period.

  • Where do the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans meet?
  • Do the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean Mix?
  • Borders of the oceans

By using this tool, we can narrow down the results year by year — and if you go back toyou can see that there are only two results for that year, one of which is a YouTube video. This clearer, better-quality video published online in July shows exactly the same scene.

'Two oceans meet but don’t mix': What does this viral video really show?

Entitled, "When the river meets the ocean," it indicates that it was taken on the Fraser River in British Columbia in Canada. Maryan Pearson, who posted the video, says she took it when she was aboard a ferry between Duke Point and Vancouver. What explains the strange sight?

where do the atlantic and pacific oceans meet

This case is similar to a photo published in that claimed to show the exact spot where the Pacific and the Atlantic meet. The photo was actually taken in by Ken Bruland, a researcher at the University of California, Santa Cruz, who was studying the phenomenon in the Gulf of Alaska.

where do the atlantic and pacific oceans meet

He explained why it happened in an article by the debunking website Snopes. Print article A picture from the Gulf of Alaska that has been making the rounds on the Internet for the last few years -- though particularly in recent weeks -- shows a strange natural phenomenon that occurs when heavy, sediment-laden water from glacial valleys and rivers pours into the open ocean.

Do the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean Mix? - santemontreal.info

There in the gulf, the two types of water run into each other, a light, almost electric blue merging with a darker slate-blue. Informally dubbed "the place where two oceans meet," the explanation for the photo is a simple one, though there are many misconceptions about it, including that catchy title.

where do the atlantic and pacific oceans meet

In particular on popular link-sharing website Reddit, where users have on multiple occasions erroneously attributed the photo's location as " Where the Baltic and North Sea meet " and the two types of water as being completely incapable of ever mixing, instead perpetually butting against each other like a boundary on a map. You also may have seen a variation on the photo featuring the same phenomenon, taken by photographer Kent Smith while on a July cruise in the Gulf of Alaska.

Mythbusting 'the place where two oceans meet' in the Gulf of Alaska

That photo too has been circulating the web for some time, though the misconceptions about it seem to be less thanks to Smith's explanation of the photo on his Flickr page. That one has also been making the rounds on Reddit and social media for years, and had racked up more thanviews by early on that one page alone, Smith said.

where do the atlantic and pacific oceans meet

That original photo, however, originates from a research cruise of oceanographers studying the role that iron plays in the Gulf of Alaska, and how that iron reaches certain areas in the northern Pacific. In fact, he was the one who snapped the pic.

He said the purpose of the cruise was to examine how huge eddies -- slow moving currents -- ranging into the hundreds of kilometers in diameter, swirl out from the Alaska coast into the Gulf of Alaska.

Those eddies often carry with them huge quantities of glacial sediment thanks to rivers like Alaska's mile-long Copper River, prized for its salmon and originating from the Copper Glacier far inland.